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HOOYAH!-2nd Edition Book Cover
(Click to enlarge)

Title: HOOYAH! UDT/SEAL Stories of the 1960s
Routine and Offbeat Exploits that Team Members have been Talking and Laughing about for Years — NEW SECOND EDITION!

Author: Richard G. "Nick" Nickelson
Retail Price: $24.94 (No charge for shipping! California Sales and Use Tax Rates by County and City will apply for orders from California.)
Publisher: Heritage Books, Inc.
2006, 5.5" x 8.5" Softcover, 288 pages and photos
ISBN: 0-7884-4250-3

 

In 1991 when KNMF was established,
More than 236,000 Angelinos
—Had No Place To Call Home

Taking It To The Streets

By the end of 2012, KNMF served 2,074 formerly homeless veterans in veteran continuum of care programs and homeless veterans recruited into these programs bringing the total served homeless veterans, formerly homeless veterans in veteran continuum of care programs, needy children, and other homeless and needy men and women to 108,707.  Los Angeles has continued to lead the nation to reduce homelessness of veterans and in 2012 had the largest decrease of 6.8% of all the homeless veterans in the country according to the 2012 HUD Point in Time Report (U.S. Census).  The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs assessment of the 2012 HUD PIT report showed that homeless veterans in LA decreased by 22% from 8,131 to 6,371 in 2012 the largest decline than any other city in the nation.  Chronically homeless veterans continue to be the target of focus by the continuum of care programs and domiciliary care programs to eliminate homelessness of veterans.  Accordingly, KNMF will continue to focus on the needs of formerly homeless veterans in veteran continuum of care programs and their efforts to continue to enroll entry level homeless veterans into their programs keeping the numbers of homeless veterans on the streets down.

Today, according to the 2012 HUD Point in Time Report, 42,353 persons are homeless on the streets of Los Angeles on any given night.*   Los Angeles had the largest decrease in homelessness nationwide from 2011 to 2012, the decline was –6.8%.  Los Angeles hosts 10% or 6,371 of the nation's homeless veteran population on any given night.  These individuals represent all races, national origins, colors, religions, disabilities, and ages.

*See the LAHSA 2009 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count report. The 2012 HUD PIT shows that the LA County homeless population is 42,353, a decline of 7% since 2009 LAHSA census.

The Numbers

Los Angeles is the home of 10% of the Nations Homeless Veteran population and 7% of the Nation's Sheltered Veterans on Any Given Night.

Since 1991, the largest number of homeless veterans in the country have resided in Los Angeles. In 1991, homeless veterans represented about 54% of the homeless population. In 2009 they represented 15%* of the homeless population according to the LAHSA report* and in 2012 they represent 10% according to the 2012 HUD PIT report. The 2012 HUD PIT report showed 42,353 homeless persons in Los Angeles and 6,371 veterans unsheltered or 10% on the night of the 2012 point-in-time census. This means that Los Angeles homeless service providers have been able to continue to extract those veterans from the homeless community and provide them with opportunities that have kept them off the streets.

U.S. homeless veterans have served in World War II, Korean War, Cold War, Vietnam War, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan), Operation Iraqi Freedom, or the military’s anti-drug cultivation efforts in South America. The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans and US Department of Veterans Affairs estimate that 47 percent of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam Era and more than 67 percent served our country for at least three years and 33 percent were stationed in a war zone.

Minorities represent the majority of all homeless persons - 47% Black, 29% Hispanic, 21% White, 2% Native American, and 1% Asian-Pacific.* An example of a veteran only count at a KNMF Veterans Day event revealed a Race/National Origin veteran participant count of 57% Black, 24% Hispanic, 9% White, and 4% Asian-Pacific, 1% Native American.

*The LAHSA 2009 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count report. The 2012 HUD PIT shows that the LA County homeless population is 42,353, a decline of 7% since 2009 LAHSA census.

Veterans' Needs

Veterans lack essential basics, including; food, clothing, shoes, hygiene supplies, linens, medical and dental attention, assistance with entitlement benefits while in recovery programs, legal assistance, continuum of care housing with case management programs, training for career ladder jobs, and employment, and for disabled and senior veterans domiciliary care long-term housing.

A Worthy Cause

The Kenny Nickelson Memorial Foundation for Homeless Veterans and Children, Inc. (KNMF) was chartered in 1991 to aid the homeless in Los Angeles, South Bay, and Harbor Cities in an effort to continue Kenny Nickelson's vital work. Prior to his death at the age of 23, Kenny devoted his life to helping those living on the streets.

KNMF Success Record

Since 1991, KNMF has assisted more than 108,707 individuals through services and personal care items.

In 1991, veterans represented 54% of the homeless population. Today, in Los Angeles veterans represent 10% of the homeless population according to the LAHSA report.* This means that KNMF and our partner homeless service providers have been able to continue to extract those veterans from the homeless community and provide them with opportunities that have kept them off the streets.

*The LAHSA 2009 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count report. The 2012 HUD PIT shows that the LA County homeless population is 42,353, a decline of 7% since 2009 LAHSA census.

 

 

With the generous support of donors, resources, and volunteers, KNMF has been able to help tens of thousands of needy individuals over the years by responding to their needs.

Personal identifiable information, including name, address, e-mail, and telephone/fax number provided by donors, volunteers, employers, colleges, trade schools, veteran service providers, or others is for the sole use of KNMF and will not be disclosed. KNMF's policy on non-disclosure of personal identifiable information went into effect on December 14, 1991.

Email for KNMF Info

 

 
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